Scott McLemee
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Elsewhere online,
I've lately written:
 
A column on writing and reading marginalia.
 
A blog entry on the Runaways.
 
Another such on Star Trek as historical artifact
 
A piece of Timber on Gang of Four

 
on John Kenneth Galbraith's
forgotten alter ego
 
of a lazy book
about DC lobbyists
 
of a good book
about the Ford administration
 
on the sublime
 
of Intellectual Affairs
than anyone will ever read 

 
 
Review of On Michael Jackson
 
Review of Voltaire Almighty
 
Column on Lu Xun and "the canon"
 
Essay on The Neutral
 
Column on the essay (as such)
 
Column on Louis Althusser
 
Essay on Joseph McCabe

(Thursday's IHE column)
 
(from Bookforum)
 
(from Newsday)
 
(Tuesday's IHE column)
 

 
Beyond Meritocracy:
A review of The Chosen
 
 
Radio Free Moby:
A column on what
Dennis Loy Johnson
is up to now
 
 
 
 
 
 
Column on
 
Column on
 
Column on
 
 
*****
 
 
about the Lisbon
earthquake of 1755
 
about Festivus
 
of E. H. Gombrich's
history of the world for children
 
about "rule of law" (RIP)
 
about group blog
run by academic librarians
 
of George Packer's
book about Iraq

My short tribute to Joseph McCabe, whose wry prose and work ethic I greatly admire. (His writings about the wonderfulness of the USSR, from late in his career, not so much.)

of various essays,
blog entries, etc.
about Katrina.
 
 
 of the "re-launch"
of Intellectual Affairs
 
 
of new book
by Barbara
Ehrenreich
 
 
 
 
 
 
Some items from late June:
 
An interview with Deborah Reed-Danahay,
author of Locating Bourdieu
 
The death of Jimmy Weinstein
 
Oscar Wilde and Michael Jackson? I think not.
 
 
 

 
 

My column, called Intellectual Affairs, runs on Tuesday and Thursday at Inside Higher Ed.

The debut column is available here.

And the second one is here.

The third column. The fourth. And plenty more. Just look around the site.....
 
 

What is plagiarism? The elements explained.
 
 
Hard News by Seth Mnookin is getting the thumbs-up from a lot of book reviewers. Actually, by pretty much all of them, it seems like. But not from me.
 
How much can you say about anything by V.S. Naipaul in eight hundred words? Gave it my best shot here.
 
 

A review of Gertude Himmelfarb's latest book
 
An introduction to Hardt and Negri
 
 

Hannah Arendt, Edward Said, the Jewish Defense League ... add it all up, it's just a mess.
 
The Women's Review of Books reaches the end of the line.

A review of a new translation of Gilgamesh.
 
A column on the National Book Awards (in particular, the nomination of the 9/11 report for its nonfiction category).
 
The full-length Derrida obituary. Roughly twice as long as the one that appeared online immediately following his death.
 
A review of a collection of psychiatric interviews with the Nazi leadership. (This one is getting a lot of hits. If you write about the Nazis, they will come.)
 
An article about Michael Mann. The historical sociologist. Not the guy who makes the blockbuster movies.
 
 

 
 
MELANCHOLY DANE UNDERGOES FEAR AND TREMBLING...HILARITY ENSUES!
Hot Type column on The Humor of Søren Kierkegaard.

 
 
Yet another attempt to subvert the cynical logic of "I realize that this conforms to the law of the spectacle, but I am doing it anyway" by, you know, doing it anyway. That trick never works.
 
 
 
THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING DISAGREEABLE:
 
 
HERTZBERG ON POLITICS
 
 
 

 
 
 
Recent Publications
 
Review-essay on some recent books concerning the Sartre/Camus dispute.
 
 
Acceptance speech for award from the National Book Critics Circle.
 
Review of The Midnight Disease: The Drive to Write, Writer's Block, and the Creative Brain by Alice Flaherty
 
Review-essay (NYTBR cover story) on William T. Vollmann's Rising Up and Rising Down
 
Review of The Coming of the Third Reich by Richard J. Evans
 
Hot Type (publishing column from the Chronicle) about the journal Oral Tradition.
 
Profile of Paula Moya, a "postpositivist realist" Chicana cultural theorist.
 
Review of Leo Braudy's From Chivalry to Terrorism: War and the Changing Nature of Masculinity.

 

 

 

March 2004

I'll list items from the last couple of months in the Archive, sooner or later....Dealing with deadlines (or not dealing with them, at the case may be) takes up too much time for me really to keep track of stuff that has actually already appeared in print. Over the next few weeks, I should have article appearing on Sartre/Camus, on Castoriadis, and on William T. Vollmann's gigantic mess of a book on violence. Plus some things in Newsday.

We had the regular story conference for the Research section at the Chronicle in late February. A couple of my proposals got a really good response -- more so than I would have figured -- and all of them are pieces that will be interesting to do. "Continuing your education in public," as somebody once put it.

 

February

Published a review of Leo Braudy's book on war last month. My Chronicle profile of Paula Moya, a Chicana cultural theorist, is a lot shorter than I wanted it to be. But so it goes. Might need to come back to the postpositivist-realist school for another article at some point. The work of Satya Mohanty is far more interesting than my piece lets on.....

This year marks the tenth anniversary of my first piece for The New York Times. Just finished a fairly long review that will appear in the first issue of March....by which point, I may have recovered my eyesight from the labor involved. That's all I can say for now.

Winning the Balakian Citation means I need to find something to say at the NBCC award ceremony in early March. Have already done a bit of pontificating on critical journalism as something besides a branch of the publicity machine. But there's plenty more where that came from. Within a few weeks, I may have an essay sketched out -- then will cut it down to whatever can be presented in a speech of five minutes at most.

Time to put together a list of story ideas for our regular section meeting at the Chronicle. Several interesting topics have piled up over the past few months -- more than will ever make it into print, unfortunately. You do what you can.